The gardens at Pear Tree Cottage sit in a cider apple orchard in the green and rolling countryside of Worcestershire, England. It enjoys a sunny south westerly aspect with sweeping views across to Martley Hillside, Woodbury & Abberley clock tower. The Teme Valley lies just over the hill and, not far away, is the Herefordshire border. Although our climate is temperate, our seasons are often uncertain and always a challenge to a gardener!

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5 August 2018

Thinning Miniature Giants!

Water lily struggles!
When the weather is seriously hot and sunny, it's always nice to find a cool job in the shade or, in this case water!  On this week's list was thinning out aquatic plants - namely the water lilies.  Some years ago I was given a miniature pink water lily.  Over time, it had taken over half the pond and almost the entire water surface was covered in plants or leaves of some sort.  Out came much of the Elodia crispa (which oxygenates the water) and watercress. Chris then donned on the waders! When he does that, he means business!

Striding out manfully into the pond, he approached the offending water lily and tried to scoop it up. The miniature water lily was now a giant and too heavy for even him to lift out. Instead he divided it into 3 sections and heaved out each one separately. It was a MONSTER of epic proportions. We replanted a single tiny piece and will be keeping a strict eye on its growth in future. Heaven knows why these plants are so expensive in garden centres. They grow like weeds!
Die!

Talking of which - we waged our continuing war on Bindweed (Convolvulus) by winding it all up, placing it in plastic bags and spraying it with a systemic weed killer. DEATH to Bindweed! The reality is, that over time, we have both won and lost Bindweed battles and this ongoing war has been fought for over 14 years. We fight on!

Meanwhile, Morning Glory (Ipomoea purpurea) is the only type of Convolvulus welcome in PTC garden! These were plants brought by Chris Genever and grow in a pot up a willow wigwam support and what a colour!

Now that's a Convolvulus!
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